The Daguerreotype and The Laser print.
How we never learn from photographic history, just repeat it in digital formats.


Let’s start from the beginning. Each Image is a single sheet of 10×8” Rollei Orthochromatic 25iso film stock. Exposed 3min’s on with a Wista 10×8” large format camera to the correct exposure and developed with a series of Iford chemicals at the correct agitation rate and times. These techniques of photographic reproduction have not changed since the start of the 20th century. But negatives are fragile and photographers are even more fragile.

The nature of this medium that in order to control the image, you have to control life, I sadly do not have that (the artist; Oliver Griffin). The people that enter into the image are not what I wanted. So the art of negative re-touching was brought in to destroy all elements that were not needed on this using the following tools; scalpel blade, lighter, shoe, and tarmac. These damaged the negative creating the unconventional effects seen in the final images. But these negatives can also be seen as stress release on photographs that were not necessarily meant to be released to the public.

These negatives are now scanned at 3200dpi in which takes 9mins to create a 1.64GB digitalized file of the image. These are then directly laser printed onto aluminum with a VULET ink and a clear TIGER 019/00600 polyurethane is applied to protect the image. This all sounds very modern, but in fact, the theory dates back to the 19th century with the Daguerreotype. Printing directly onto a metallic surface that reflects light in order to capture an image is nothing new, but rarely used in this day and age due to functionally.

The combination of the traditional photographic theory and the practice of digital processes to produce this work make me think (the artist; Oliver Griffin) about changes within this medium within his lifetime of photographic education. Trying to understand the philosophy and practice of this medium that is ever changing. But as human beings, we only fail and we never learn from photographic history, just repeat it in digital formats.

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The nature of this medium that in order to control the image, you have to control life, I sadly do not have that (the artist; Oliver Griffin). The people that enter into the image are not what I wanted. So the art of negative re-touching was brought in to destroy all elements that were not needed on this using the following tools; scalpel blade, lighter, shoe, and tarmac. These damaged the negative creating the unconventional effects seen in the final images. But these negatives can also be seen as stress release on photographs that were not necessarily meant to be released to the public.

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Yes, you did meet Oliver Griffin
and yes he was boring.